Put a sign or sticker on your door or house that says ‘Do not knock’.
When you do this, sales people are not allowed to knock.

Call NT Consumer Affairs on 1800 019 319.

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Who Can Help? (Service Providers)

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Text based resources about this topic

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Avoid a funeral RIP-off (fact sheet)

This fact sheet talks about funeral benefits. There are different ways to pay for a funeral, but some may be more suitable for you than others.

Your rights when you buy something (ReadSpeaker)

This Easy English (ReadSpeaker) guide explains your consumer rights and the steps you can take to resolve problems.

Charities, Religious Callers, Market Researchers and the Do Not Knock Sticker

This web page gives an FAQ on the do not knock sticker and whether it applies to charities, religious visitors and market research agencies.

Get the Sticker

This web page gives information about how to display the do not knock sticker and where to get one.

Travelling Con Men

This web page gives tips on how to identify travelling con men and how to protect yourself and your community.

Know your rights when you’re doorknocked

This web page talks about the law around door to door sales and the consumers rights.

Avoiding sales pressure

This website talks about common things that sales people do to get you to buy something. It gives tips on what to say to them.

Watch videos about this topic

Watch

Avoid a funeral RIP-off

This video talks about funeral plans. Funerals can be expensive. There are different ways to cover the cost of your funeral so don’t rush into a decision. Find the one that’s right for you.

 

Thanks but no thanks:pressure

This film looks at the way salespeople pressure and how to say “thanks but no thanks” when you don’t want to be rude but want them to leave.

 

Thanks, but no thanks: Cool Off

This video illustrates some of the high pressure sales tactics used and gives a useful phrase “thanks but no thanks” for consumers to use. Explains the unsolicited agreement requirements.

 

Door to Door Sales

This video gives tips on asking sales people to leave and cooling off periods.

 

Resources to listen to

Listen

Thanks but no thanks: Inducement

This video runs through using “thanks but no thanks” to make a sales person leave and the do not knock sticker.

 

View graphic resources like posters and photos

Look

Your rights when you buy something (Arabic)

This Easy English (Arabic) guide explains your consumer rights and the steps you can take to resolve problems.

Click here to view Your rights when you buy something (Arabic)
Your rights when you buy something (Vietnamese)

This Easy English (Vietnamese) guide explains your consumer rights and the steps you can take to resolve problems.

Click here to view Your rights when you buy something (Vietnamese)
Your rights when you buy something (Tagalog)

This Easy English (Tagalog) guide explains your consumer rights and the steps you can take to resolve problems.

Click here to view Your rights when you buy something (Tagalog)
Your rights when you buy something (Spanish)

This Easy English (Spanish) guide explains your consumer rights and the steps you can take to resolve problems.

Click here to view Your rights when you buy something (Spanish)
Your rights when you buy something (Italian)

This Easy English (Italian) guide explains your consumer rights and the steps you can take to resolve problems.

Click here to view Your rights when you buy something (Italian)
Your rights when you buy something (Hindi)

This Easy English (Hindi) guide explains your consumer rights and the steps you can take to resolve problems.

Click here to view Your rights when you buy something (Hindi)
Your rights when you buy something (Greek)

This Easy English (Greek) guide explains your consumer rights and the steps you can take to resolve problems.

Click here to view Your rights when you buy something (Greek)
Your rights when you buy something (Chinese simplified)

This Easy English (Chinese simplified) guide explains your consumer rights and the steps you can take to resolve problems.

Click here to view Your rights when you buy something (Chinese simplified)
Your rights when you buy something

This Easy English guide explains your consumer rights and the steps you can take to resolve problems. 

Click here to view Your rights when you buy something
Do Not Knock Sign

A sign that tells people not to knock on the door and try to sell things.

Click here to view Do Not Knock Sign

Glossary: What these words mean

cooling-off period

Sometimes when you buy something or sign a contract there is a cooling-off period. This is a set period of time where you can cancel the purchase or contract and get your money back. Usually cooling-off periods are for expensive things (like houses or cars), or contracts that mean you will have to pay for a long time (like gym memberships).

visitor

A person who goes somewhere for a short time. For example, anyone who comes into your house with your permission is your visitor.

unsolicited consumer agreement

When someone tries to sell you something that you haven’t asked for and you agree to buy it. The person might call you on the phone, visit your house, or come to you in a public area.

 

This website gives general legal information. It is not legal advice. If you need advice for your problem, please talk to a lawyer.

Click here to find a legal service near you.

If there is information on this website that you think is wrong please contact us.

This website is a project of the NT Community Legal Education Network.
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